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8.8/10
Orange Is the New Black (Piper Kerman)

What a shocker! A well-educated, upper class white woman goes to prison and builds strong bonds with her fellow inmates, who are mostly undereducated women of color from the wrong side of the tracks. I liked the book and I liked her. I did. But it irritates me that she seems to be marketing the book as this revealing story about how we’re all just human after all. I didn’t find her writing condescending of the other women. I found her to be non-judgmental and a truly good friend to everyone worthy of her friendship. She suffers the indignities of prison with a straightforward kind of courage. She takes pride in the friendships she builds, in the work she does in prison and when opportunities arise for her because of her blonde hair and “tight ass” – opportunities that would endear her to the prison staff yet distance her from her fellow inmates – she politely turns them down. So what’s my problem? Well, maybe this is unfair of me, but here goes: It still feels too self-congratulatory, too arrogant. And WAY too self-serving. While these friendships were meaningful to her in prison, I highly doubt she maintains them. She…

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8.7/10
The Hate U Give (Angie Thomas)

This was such a heartbreakingly honest account of what is happening in America right now. As a white reader, the experience this story affords its readers cannot be taken for granted. Inspired by the Black Lives Matter movement, this book takes you into the heart of Garden Heights after the main character has witnessed the wrongful murder of her best friend Khalil by a police officers. Being Canadian, as well as being white, I have the privilege of not having to deal with any of the things Starr deals with on a day to day basis but the experience of being alongside her as she grappled with the injustice of it all gave me a completely new understanding of what is going on in America. I obviously am not ignorant to it all, but this just felt like an honest firsthand account. It really is indescribable. This is such an important read and I highly encourage you to pick it up. I will do a full spoiler free review and spoiler discussion on my channel very soon.    Support this site by buying the book through the links below. Thank you very much!    Buy now on eBay    Buy…

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8.8/10
One Summer in Italy (Sue Moorcroft)

When Sofia Bianchi’s father Aldo dies, it makes her stop and look at things afresh. Having been his carer for so many years, she knows it’s time for her to live her own life – and to fulfil some promises she made to Aldo in his final days. So there’s nothing for it but to escape to Italy’s Umbrian mountains where, tucked away in a sleepy Italian village, lie plenty of family secrets waiting to be discovered. There, Sofia also finds Amy who is desperately trying to find her way in life after discovering her dad isn’t her biological father. Sofia sets about helping Amy through this difficult time, but it’s the handsome Levi who proves to be the biggest distraction for Sofia, as her new life starts to take off…    Support this site by buying the book through the links below. Thank you very much!    Buy now on eBay    Buy now on Amazon

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7.8/10
Borrowing Brilliance: The Six Steps to Business Innovation by Building on the Ideas of Others (David Kord Murray)

In a book poised to become the bible of innovation, a renowned creativity expert reveals the key to the creative process borrowing.? As a former aerospace scientist, Fortune 500 executive, chief innovation officer of two major companies, inventor and software entrepreneur, David Murray has made a living by coming up with new and innovative ideas. In “Borrowing Brilliance” he explains the origins and evolution of a business idea by showing readers how new ideas are merely the combinations of existing ideas. Since brilliance is actually borrowed, it’s easily within reach. It’s really a matter of knowing where to borrow the materials and how to put them together that determines creative ability. Murray presents a simple Six-Step process that anyone can use to build business innovation: Step One: “Defining”?Define the problem you?re trying to solve. Step Two: “Borrowing”?Borrow ideas from places with a similar problem. Step Three: “Combining”?Connect and combine these borrowed ideas. Step Four: “Incubating”?Allow the combinations to incubate into a solution. Step Five: “Judging”?Identify the strength and weakness of the solution. Step Six: “Enhancing”?Eliminate the weak points while enhancing the strong ones. Each chapter features real-life examples of brilliant borrowers, including profiles of Larry Page and Sergey Brin (the…

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7.9/10
Digging In (Loretta Nyhan)

Payge is in her mid forties, has been a widow for 2 years, and she’ll still trying to find her footing. Her relationship with her 17 year old son is shaky and her job with a small advertising agency seems to be hanging by a thread. The story bumbles along somewhat predictably, as Payge sinks to new lows, and slowly makes her way uphill to a better place. Along the way, she digs up a crazy garden and makes new friends. Despite the starting point, the tone of this novel is quite light. Humorous and sentimental — it has a definite romcom feeling. To me, the best part of Digging In was the afterword, in which the author describes losing her own husband at age 45, and how she and her two sons were helped and supported by family and friends. With that context, the book seems like the author’s own attempt to cope with her grief. I have a lot of sympathy and can understand the need for a immersive project, but I didn’t love the book.    Support this site by buying the book through the links below. Thank you very much!    Buy now on eBay   …

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8.5/10
The Rules Of Engagement: The Art of Strategic Prayer and Spiritual Warfare (Cindy Trimm)

This Manual was a Holy Grail for me in college, its own praxis. The only way to digest and fully unlock this masterpiece is to engage in a soul fast ordained by God. This is not grandma’s Sunday school book by any means, I’m sure that i didn’t unlock all the keys. The words she shares have strong spiritual repercussions, and life changing effects. This book is like basic training for a military, not everyone qualifies(pride, ego, and self reliance have to be trashed). It’s as much about faith as it is about sacrifice. she’s been graced by God to endeavor in certain dimensions not privy to many in this dispensation but opening the door for others to join in. As a general she purposefully superimposes new logic upon old scriptural concepts to activate new trajectories and open new realms of being. If you can’t connect to this piece on a spiritual level, you’ll mistake it for logic and reason but this book is all about divine principal, Strategy, and Kingdom Culture. With proper application and divine assistance, you’ll go beyond the life , beyond the alter of incense, into the realm of dominion. ——————————————————————————————————————– This is a very profound…

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7.3/10
Thinking, Fast and Slow (Daniel Kahnemann)

The book is a lengthy, self-conscious and a challenging read but highly recommended if you’re interested in why human beings behave the way they behave. It’s given me so much ‘oh snap, so that’s why we’re so dumb’ moments that at this point I don’t even want to admit I’m a human to any space-time traveling race that comes in collision of 21st century Earth. Citing behavioral research studies, he’s convinced me that human confidence is a measure of whether a person has built up a coherent story not that the person truly knows what she’s doing. He’s convinced me that the feeling of ‘ease’ is just cognitive familiarity. He’s convinced me why first impressions matter more than we think due to the Halo effect. He’s convinced me that the human mind doesn’t understand non-events. We think we understand the past, but we really don’t. We create coherency by attributing causality to events, but not to non-events. In other words we underestimate the role of luck or the role of unknown variables in a given situation. He has given me reason to believe that in low validity environments, it’s better to use formula’s than to listen to expert human judgment.…

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7.4/10
The Subtle Art of Not Giving a F*ck: A Counterintuitive Approach to Living a Good Life (Mark Manson)

I went into this admittedly with quite some skepticism and entitlement— “what is this going to teach me that I don’t already know?”— but The Subtle Art of Not Giving a F*ck is truly one of the most ground-shaping nonfiction books I’ve read so far. It will and can change a perspective, a life. And as such, this is the perfect book to give to your loved ones on holidays, birthdays… It made me rethink all the times I ever gave a fuck over some of the most irrelevant things in hindsight. It made me realize that it’s sometimes necessary to take a step back and re-evaluate why I think so-and-so on a daily basis. I also wrote down a lot of Mark Manson’s writing into my notes because I knew I would need it in the near future. And I would like to thank him for answering quite a lot of fears of mine with such a dose of raw, refreshing, honest truth. The Subtle Art of Not Giving a F*ck was both personally relevant and entertaining. Here are a few pieces that helped me and then some: “The key to a good life is not giving a fuck…