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7.8/10
Make Your Bed: Little Things That Can Change Your Life…And Maybe the World (William H. McRaven)

Make Your Bed is an incredible gem packaged tightly into a small book that lends itself well to an easy and quick read. This book offers tidbits that are simplistic yet powerful. Each chapter highlights a little thing that can make great change in one’s life which then can change the world. The statement “change the world” may seem pompous and easily blown off as unrealistic, but really, each of us do indeed make decisions on a daily basis that can affect others. The question is do we want to make change within ourselves which then has the potential to impact others? This may sound like a boring book, but it’s far from boring. Admiral William H. McRaven wrote each chapter with a tone of humility, as evident of how he concisely told personal stories and stories of others to show how the little things in life have the potential to make a huge impact on your life. These stories are real and down to earth. None of them highlight a “super hero” moment but rather the daily and seemingly unimportant. Make Your Bed is packed with small, very real, doable, and applicable life gems regardless of a person’s station…

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8.1/10
The Ginger Tree (Oswald Wynd)

An indefinable flavor, sweet and pungent at the same time. Like ginger, Mary’s character oscillates between opposites. Sent to China to marry a notable English, she immediately reveals his rebellious temperament in his diary. In this distant East, the intoxicating scents combined with the sensuality of a Japanese officer will eventually turn his head. When the story ends, it’s an intense life in vicissitudes that closes. Far from the boring fate of a housewife who had been reserved for her!    Support this site by buying the book through the links below. Thank you very much!    Buy now on eBay    Buy now on Amazon

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8.2/10
Secrets of Power Negotiating: Inside Secrets from a Master Negotiator (Roger Dawson)

Secrets to Power Negotiation has a simple philosophy: Create a win-win solution out of every negotiation so that all parties involved feel good afterwards. The negotiation process should be fun, like a game of chess. After this game, both players are happy about the fair outcome. They even would like to play again (not out of revenge), but to experience the fun. But just like a game of chess, you need to learn the techniques with which to play the game. The book offers many techniques which you can practice and master that helps you gain what you need from a negotiation at work, home, etc. While the philosophy states that everyone should feel like a winner after a negotiation, it is naive to think that someone is going to simply hand this over to you. You need to learn the techniques to protect yourself and gain what is your right. Of course not all of the techniques will always have the intended outcome (just like a game of chess). But by practicing them in real life you can make sure more often than not you will get what you desire. Moreover, the sense of confidence you gain by having…

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8.1/10
Running With Lions (Julian Winters)

Running With Lions is a coming-of-age novel following bisexual rising senior Sebastian Hughes who’s eagerly anticipating his last summer at soccer training camp and settling into his role of team captain. His plan, however, quickly loses its footing when Emir Shah, a Muslim British-Pakistani new recruit and Sebastian’s former best friend, unexpectedly arrives – partly because of Emir’s impressive bad attitude and his insistence on keeping his teammates at arm’s lengh, and more than partly because of the long, lean shadow of his and Sebastian’s sour parting. Sebastian is left with the responsibility of bringing his team together while feeling the caution of wondering if his attraction for Emir would bloom into something more. First of all, I’m one of those people who are so full of love they could explode: you could casually mention something or someone I love and it would take every ounce of my self-control not to propel myself into the stars and scream for the rest of eternity about how much I love them. But also, I’m one of those people who hate showing affection and cringe internally anytime someone else does. I’m basically half an unrelenting cynic, half a hopeless romantic and the two…

1
8.4/10
The Republic of Tea: The Story of the Creation of a Business, as Told Through the Personal Letters of Its Founders (Mel Ziegler, Patricia Ziegler, Bill Rosenzweig)

A business book in the form of letter is pretty unique. The downside is that the narrative dragged at times. There were enough insights throughout to make it worthwhile. Here are a few: “Ultimate success in business will depend on whether the business person is yielding and flexible and responsive enough to go with the unknowns as they present themselves, day by day.” “Practice not-doing, and everything will fall into place…“Not-doing,” I discovered, was not at all about whether I worked or did not work, but it did have something to do with what is behind the work, the motive. If I worked for a selfish result, something that would benefit me, that was “doing.” But if I worked for the work itself, totally absorbed myself in the means and gave no thought to the end, that was “not-doing. […]“Not-doing,” I learned, was listening to what wants to happen of itself, not forcing it, not attempting to control, but only serving it by helping to remove the obstacles that are keeping it from happening.”    Support this site by buying the book through the links below. Thank you very much!    Buy now on eBay    Buy now on Amazon

1
8.5/10
My Husband’s Lies (Caroline England)

On the afternoon of Nick and Lisa’s wedding, their close friend is found poised on a hotel window ledge, ready to jump. As the shock hits their friendship group, they soon realise that none of them are being as honest with themselves – or with each other – as they think. And there are secrets lurking that could destroy everything. Tense, disturbing and clever, My Husband’s Lies is a breath-taking read, perfect for fans of Lucy Clarke and Erin Kelly.    Support this site by buying the book through the links below. Thank you very much!    Buy now on eBay    Buy now on Amazon

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8.1/10
We Were The Lucky Ones (Georgia Hunter)

As the Kurc family, a Polish-Jew family, is having its last meal together (they do not know this yet), they talk about babies and their growing family. While they see signs of a potential struggle, they also believe it will not amount to much. As Hitler grows in power though, they are sadly proven wrong. In their race to survive, they flee, hide in plain sight or resort to just about anything that will increase the likelihood of being able to see each other again. Through five continents and six years, this family will do the impossible to reunite. WWII and Holocaust novels are abundant. I, myself, read quite a bit of them. While there is not anything intrinsically different in this novel than there is in the others that have been published, each is valuable. Each has its own voice and heart. This narrative belongs to the Kurc family as they attempt to survive Hitler´s destruction. Spanning five continents and six years, the story takes place in Poland, France, Italy, Siberia, and Brazil (just to name of the the locations). Based on the author´s family, this is a narrative about resilience in the face of adversity but its also…

3
7/10
Everything is Obvious: Once You Know the Answer (Duncan J. Watts)

Why is the Mona Lisa the most famous painting in the world? Why did Facebook succeed when other social networking sites failed? Did the surge in Iraq really lead to less violence? How much can CEO’s impact the performance of their companies? And does higher pay incentivize people to work hard? If you think the answers to these questions are a matter of common sense, think again. As sociologist and network science pioneer Duncan Watts explains in this provocative book, the explanations that we give for the outcomes that we observe in life—explanation that seem obvious once we know the answer—are less useful than they seem. Drawing on the latest scientific research, along with a wealth of historical and contemporary examples, Watts shows how common sense reasoning and history conspire to mislead us into believing that we understand more about the world of human behavior than we do; and in turn, why attempts to predict, manage, or manipulate social and economic systems so often go awry. It seems obvious, for example, that people respond to incentives; yet policy makers and managers alike frequently fail to anticipate how people will respond to the incentives they create. Social trends often seem to…